Tag: Humanitarian

Top 10 Reasons to Visit St Judes while on Safari with ADS

The School of St Jude is a charity funded school that provides a free, high-quality primary and secondary education to over 1,600 of the poorest, brightest children of Arusha region, Tanzania, East Africa. The school, located across three campuses, also provides boarding for 1,100 students, and employs over 450 Tanzanians. It was founded by Australian Gemma Sisia in 2002.

(all photos by School of St. Jude)

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Traveling to Tanzania this year? Your trip can help the local community.

The Foundation for African Medicine and Education, a charitable organization that was founded to provide quality medical care to the local people living in rural Tanzania, is exploring cost effective ways of getting medical supplies and equipment, as well as health education materials sent from the U.S. to Tanzania. Their U.S. volunteers have been able to help enormously on this front, bringing extra suitcases when they travel to Tanzania, but with their patient growth and program expansion, they are needing even more help.

If any guests with upcoming safaris think they might be interested in helping out by carrying an extra suitcase, please let us know. We would provide reimbursement for any luggage fees incurred as well as provide a special Tanzanian gift/souvenir as our way of saying thanks. And, of course, you are more then welcome to tour the F.A.M.E. facility, meet Dr. Frank and his wife Susan and learn more about how they are making a real difference in the lives of local Tanzanians.

Dr. Frank Artress and his wife, Susan Gustafson, from the United States, founded F.A.M.E. in 2002. F.A.M.E. was created to help bridge the gap between a critically under-resourced health care system and first world medicine. Frank and Susan live and work in Tanzania, overseeing the day-to-day operations of various projects. These have included construction and operation of an Outpatient Clinic in Karatu and the operation of a Mobile Medical Service in very remote locations in the region. Despite a major shortage of healthcare workers in the country, particularly in rural areas, F.A.M.E employs an exceptional all Tanzanian medical team.

Here is a new video that provides insight into the incredible work of the organization with interviews from its founders Susan Gustafson & Dr. Frank Artress. The piece also interviews an ADS guest who visited FAME during a safari trip with us. Find out how you can help to make a difference in the lives of local Tanzanians.

To learn more about our partnership with FAME visit: africadreamsafaris.com/community/humanitarian/foundation-for-african-medicine-education

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Giving Josh a Helping Hand

Prep student Josh has already gone through a rite of passage for a young child, in only a few short months. Josh earned his boyhood stripes when he broke his arm while falling off play equipment at St Jude’s. He has gained the status as the only kid in the playground with a sling and he’s enjoying the attention while he can. Recovery has been quick for Josh, thanks to the caring support of the St Jude’s Health and Welfare team. The day a teacher carried him in with his painful, broken arm, the Lower Primary Medical Officer, Brenda was on hand to provide assistance. She carefully placed Josh’s arm in a bandage, then notified his parents before taking him to the hospital in one of our school buses. ADS proudly sponsors The School of St. Jude. Here’s their monthly update:

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Going The Extra Mile For Sebastian

Two Lower Primary teachers at St Jude’s are going beyond the normal duties of teaching to help a little prep child, who is overcoming major hurdles, as he has albinism and suffers severe visual problems. Martha Dello and Anna Nnko are up for the challenge though and are doing all they can to help Sebastian succeed in his studies. ADS proudly sponsors The School of St. Jude. Here’s their monthly update:

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St Jude’s Promotes Innovation at its 4th Annual Science Fair

Two Form 4 students, Eunice and Robert, took out first prize for their unique refrigerator project in the fourth annual St Jude’s Science Fair. The students made the refrigerator out of tiles, cement, charcoal and other materials and it is designed for Tanzanian people who don’t have electricity in rural communities to use. Crops and other food can be preserved and stored in it.

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St. Jude Thanks ADS

We urge all ADS clients to visit the Arusha school campus for a quick tour, say hi to the children and learn how this amazing operation is providing free education to Tanzania’s brightest kids. This quick tour can be done either before or after your safari. Please contact your safari consultant if you are interested.

ADS as Proud Sponsor

The School of St Jude and Africa Dream Safaris are working together to help impoverished children in Tanzania to receive a free, high-quality education, while strengthening ADS’ humanitarian involvement in the East African community. Our monthly donation will buy 2,000 hot, nutritious meals per month for the students. Tanzania is a developing country where one-third of its population lives below the poverty line, on less than $1.25 per day. A majority of children in Tanzanian schools do not receive lunch or any food, so they cannot focus on learning when they’re hungry. St Jude’s provides daily meals for students, as well as breakfast and dinner for the over 1,100 students who live in their boarding houses. All produce is sourced from the local community.

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The School Of St Jude Thanks You!

We would like to thank ADS clients John & Delane Marynawski who recently visited The School of St Jude on February 8th and donated several items including the soccer equipment show in the picture above. We urge all ADS clients to visit the school campus for a quick tour, say hi to the children and learn how this amazing operation is providing free education to Tanzania’s brightest kids. This quick tour can be done either before or after your safari. Please contact your safari consultant if you are interested.

ADS as Proud Sponsor

The School of St Jude and Africa Dream Safaris are working together to help impoverished children in Tanzania to receive a free, high-quality education, while strengthening ADS’ humanitarian involvement in the East African community. Our monthly donation will buy 2,000 hot, nutritious meals per month for the students. Tanzania is a developing country where one-third of its population lives below the poverty line, on less than $1.25 per day. A majority of children in Tanzanian schools do not receive lunch or any food, so they cannot focus on learning when they’re hungry. St Jude’s provides daily meals for students, as well as breakfast and dinner for the over 1,100 students who live in their boarding houses. All produce is sourced from the local community.

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Starting a Ripple that Reaches Far and Wide

ADS proudly sponsors the School of St. Jude – a charity funded school in Tanzania that provides a free, high-quality primary and secondary education to over 1,600 of the poorest, brightest children of the Arusha region. Each month we receive an update on St. Jude’s progress. This month, two teachers reflect on how the school has impacted their lives…

When a teacher receives a job at St Jude’s it has a big impact on their life. At St Jude’s teachers are provided with stable employment, amazing resources and a competitive salary. On top of that they receive health insurance, daily nutritious meals and transport to and from work.

All teachers are supported through ongoing professional development through a teacher mentor program. International teacher mentors volunteer their time to help local teachers learn educational techniques from all over the world and ensure they can perfect their English.

With so many extremely under resourced schools in Tanzania and with a high unemployment rate, all of our teachers are aware of the positive impact their job has on their overall life. A stable job also means that all of our teachers’ families benefit too. “Many Tanzanian people are poor. There are some families who take their kids to local primary school, they can’t afford it. The salary helped not only me but also my family. I can help my parents and some children also needed my help. There are children out there who sometimes don’t have money to buy their school uniforms or books, I can’t help them that much but I can afford to buy one school uniform. If I was not working here, if I am not working here, it means I could not afford to pay bills,” says Amina, Maths Teacher, Lower Primary.

Listen to our teachers talk about how working at St Jude’s has impacted on their lives:

Teachers play such a vital role in turning our students into future leaders. They do an amazing job working hard to create brilliant minds and successful, well-rounded adults.

“I think that with the education that they have received at St Jude’s, they’re going to stand out in the crowd because they’ve got something that’s different from other children. So, I think by getting the education here it’s going to help the whole community. Not only Arusha, but all over Tanzania,” says Julieth, a St Jude’s teacher. This is just another part of the ripple effect caused by educating one of the poorest and brightest students in the Arusha region. Please consider starting your own ripple today by sponsoring a student or teacher:

{ schoolofstjude.org/Donations/sponsorships.html }

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School of St Jude: Eva Grows Up

The School of St Jude and Africa Dream Safaris are working together to help impoverished children in Tanzania to receive a free, high-quality education, while strengthening ADS’ humanitarian involvement in the East African community. Our monthly donation will buy 2,000 hot, nutritious meals per month for the students. Tanzania is a developing country where one-third of its population lives below the poverty line, on less than $1.25 per day. A majority of children in Tanzanian schools do not receive lunch or any food, so they cannot focus on learning when they’re hungry. St Jude’s provides daily meals for students, as well as breakfast and dinner for the over 1,100 students who live in their boarding houses. All produce is sourced from the local community.

Below is the story about a student named Eva from the School of St Jude. (Provided by SSJ)

Six years ago, young Eva’s face beamed from the cover of the autobiography of our school founder Gemma Sisia, titled ‘St Jude’s.’ Eva was a young girl who was still realizing her dreams. She epitomized the happy, bright eyed child at St Jude’s who is overjoyed about getting a free, high quality education. Now she has grown and is developing into a well-adjusted young adult. She is in Form 1 and has big aspirations, with a world of possibilities in front of her. This is her story.

Eva started at St Jude’s in 2006, when the school was just four years old and we had just over 600 students and around 115 staff. Eva’s family includes her father, John, mother, Penina and younger brothers Richard and Benjamin. They live in a two-room brick home and like many other Tanzanian dwellings, the home has no plumbing (water is collected from a neighborhood tap for a small monthly fee) and meals are prepared over a charcoal or basic kerosene-fueled stove.

To support the family, Eva’s father finds work where he can as a carpenter and a mason. Her mother works at their home as a tailor. They are big supporters of Eva’s education and encourage her to continue learning in the hope that one day she will have qualifications and a successful career so she can break the cycle of poverty for herself, help them and her community.

Eva showed promise as a capable student at a young age. As a child, she would often ask her parents to send her to a school which would enable her to learn English. “I wanted to learn English because I knew in this world of today that I needed it and I strived to get a high quality education as I wanted to have a bright future,” she said.

She grew up playing with her younger brother and their games would regularly revolve around learning. “There was one game where we liked to draw and the first one to finish was the winner. The aim of it was that you drew things, like an egg and you also wrote the name of it in English. So, I always liked to play games where I could learn new words.”
Before St Jude’s, Eva attended a government school where nearly all of her subjects were in Swahili. It was a limited learning environment where Eva felt she was not able to reach her full potential. She remembers hearing about St Jude’s at her old school and then soon applied. It was a turning point in her life.

After passing the relevant checks, she was accepted and began a new chapter of her life. “When I found out I was going to St Jude’s, I thought it was amazing and I was very happy. It meant a lot to me,” said Eva. Since then she has fulfilled a number of milestones. She successfully completed her seven years of primary schooling, has begun high school and has impressively scored A’s in almost all of her subjects. She also boards at the school’s Smith campus which is preparing her to be a strong, independent individual.

Eva’s life has been transformed because of her education. She has sponsors in Australia and is acutely aware that their support has enabled her to have clean uniforms, a place to board, fresh, nutritional food, committed teachers and access to state-of-the-art ICT laboratories and well-stocked libraries.

Research supports the assertion that sponsorship can make a huge difference in a child’s life. Bruce Wydick, an economist from the University of San Francisco carried out a study in six countries over three continents, including in Uganda and Kenya. He and his team studied more than 10-thousand individuals who had been sponsored in the 1980s. The overall result was that student sponsorship works and that 50 to 80 per cent are more likely to complete a university education.

“By sponsoring a child at St Jude’s you will change the life of that child, their family, their community and contribute to changing their country. The evidence says it works, the economics says it works and if you visit the school you can see for yourself that it works. What better way is there of using your money?” said St Jude’s School Director John Ford.
Eva, the little girl that once shyly took her first steps through the St Jude’s gates seven years ago, has grown into a happy, confident young adult. She is like any other teenager who enjoys spending time with her friends and playing card games. In a few years, Eva plans to head to university to study engineering and work in Tanzania. Like the young girl on the cover of St Jude’s, she is optimistic, loving life, has the world at her feet and ready to embrace it.

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Story of 17-year-old Denis, from The School of St. Jude

Denis is a student at The School of St Jude*, in Arusha, Northern Tanzania. He is currently in Form 3, the equivalent of 10th grade. He and another 47 of our students are busy working on writing essays for The Tanzania Bureau of Standards’ national competition among secondary schools. Last year, out of ten finalists, six were St Jude’s students. Denis, then in Form 2 (9th grade), came in second place. Soon after his great achievement, we invited him to write about a moment that meant something to him. We wish Denis and all the other students good luck in this year’s competition.

The Moment that Meant Something in My Life

My name is Denis, aged 17 years old. In my family I have my father, two brothers and one sister. My family is a single-parent family because in March 2007 my mother passed away from a heart disease. My hobbies are playing soccer and reading updated news. Also I have a plan of one day being a doctor.

In 2005 I had a moment which really meant something in my life and this was the moment I joined The School of St Jude. Joining the school meant a lot in my life because before I did not have any plan. Instead, I thought, I can never make it in life.

These thoughts came as a result of failing in my exam, getting tough punishments and having an unpleasant environment for studying. All this made me not to attend school in most of the days. Instead I would hide in the street until after school hours and I could return back home with my friend who went to school.

But after joining St Jude’s my life changed and I saw school as a better place to live. This is because I met good teachers, transportation, a conducive environment and fantastic learning resources. Also I started having plans and I saw that one day I will make it. That’s why I can say that joining the School of St Jude meant a lot in my life.

The School of St Jude put me in a place where I can never give up. Instead I will work hard so that I can fulfill my dream of becoming a doctor. I know that I can make it. This is because if anybody else can do it, I can do it better. This means that if people like Ben Carson were able to make it I can make it too. On the other hand I would like to thank my school and my sponsor for the support which I have been receiving and I promise to work extra hard so that I can make it and bring success and changes in my community.

* The School of St Jude provides a free quality education for over 1600 students. Besides the regular Tanzanian curriculum, we offer well-stacked libraries, computer and art rooms, science labs, sports fields, school buses, hot meals, boarding houses, free textbooks and uniforms. Sponsors from all around the world make it possible. We love visitors. If you are on a safari and want to drop in on your way in or out of Arusha, please let Africa Dream Safaris know in advance so they can incorporate this in your itinerary.

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